Starred Review from Publisher’s Weekly

Well, this is pretty cool. Publisher’s Weekly, the industry’s leading news and review publication, gave Pandemonium a starred review. (And already I can hear my Mom wondering what a star means, and I don’t really know. My rough count says that about 10% of the reviews get a star.  So, harder to get than a star from Mrs. Melbaum, my kindergarten teacher, but much easier to get than a star on the Walk of Fame.)

Here’s the review:

Believable characters, a multilayered plot and smooth prose define Gregory’s darkly ambitious debut novel. In this fascinating alternative time line, thousands of demon possessions have been carefully recorded by scientists each year since the 1950s. Each case is always the same: a recognizable, named “strain of the disorder” possesses a person, wreaks havoc and then jumps on to its next victim. Del Pierce’s case is unique: when the Hellion possessed him at the age of five, it never left. Now an unhappy 20-something, Del undertakes a dangerous quest to exorcise the Hellion as it fights him for control. The trim prose keeps the pace intense and the action red hot through some emotionally disturbing scenes and heavy backstory. Absorbing psychological discussions of possession abound, from Jungian archetypes to the eye of Shiva. Readers will delve deeply into Gregory’s highly original demon-infested reality and hope for a sequel. (Sept.)  PW page.

My only problem? The next book (the latest draft of which is going to my publisher on August 1) has nothing to do with the world of Pandemonium.

I did an interview with one of the PW reporters a few weeks ago — I’m not sure when they’ll be running that.

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9 thoughts on “Starred Review from Publisher’s Weekly

  1. Wow, that’s fantastic! Congratulations!!! I’m not surprised about the star, given how much I liked (unrelated) novel #2, though. Can’t wait to read Pandemonium!

  2. Woohoo! Yay for starred reviews!!! Congratulations.

    And I’m sure you can make your next book a sequel if you try hard enough. You are simply not using sufficient imagination.

    It’s great that someone wants a sequel. You must be doing something right.

  3. Hi Jenn, Hi Deb!

    Deb, you’re absolutely right. From now on, Book #2 is a sequel, but the links to book #1 are so subtle that only the most perceptive of readers will see the connections. If they can’t see them, it’s hardly my fault.

  4. Greg, Mrs. Melbaum was a total pushover. Talk about grade inflation. Kindergarten was a frickin’ CAKEWALK. No academic rigor whatsoever. And Tim Lennox? Your drawing of a firetruck was completely out of proportion — those wheels were the size of houses. I can’t believe Mrs. M gave you a star for that crap.

  5. Awesome!! How exciting. I’m assuming you’ll be signing copies at Readercon.
    See you then!

  6. Alas, the book’s coming out too late for ReaderCon AND WorldCon.

    But World Fantasy? I’ll be a signing fool. Or at least a fool with a box of books.

  7. Hey Daryl, I’m glad to see the book is getting good reviews! Any chance you’ll be doing a reading at WorldCon?

    –T. Kosmatka

  8. Kosmo! I’m going to WorldCon, and I’m doing a couple panels, but I haven’t heard anything about doing a reading. (I can’t remember if I even asked to read.) I AM doing a reading tomorrow at ReaderCon — my first ever, and I haven’t even practiced yet.

    Sarah K, I know you’ll be at the con, so you gotta come support me! (I’m afraid I’ll be reading to an empty room.) There’s a beer in it for you.

    And Ted, find me in Denver, man — I want to shake your hand. (Folks, Ted’s had a hell of a year — his story “Prophet of Flores” is in every Year’s Best, and is up for a Nebula.)

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